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Pawsitive Training for Better Dogs

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Bailey reserves the right to edit any posting for spelling, grammar, length, and inappropriate content. Only one question per person will be considered. Your question may or may not be posted with Bailey's reply. Bailey can take up to several months to reply to questions. He is extremely busy being a dog.

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Disclaimer: The material provided by Bailey on this web site is designed for educational and entertainment purposes only. The information presented is provided with the understanding that Bailey is not engaged in rendering medical or professional behavioral services. Such information should not be used as a substitute for behavioral advice provided by a qualified canine behavior therapist.

Please remember that Bailey's advice, comments, or opinions are solely Bailey's, and do not necessarily reflect those of the staff here at Pawsitive Training for Better Dogs.

Pawsitive Training for Better Dogs is not responsible for actions taken based on the advice provided herein.

Puppy Problems

Dear Bailey,

I'm having a problem. You see, I have a nine-month-old beagle, let's call her Fay. I just got a two-month-old beagle, Chelsea who continuously snaps at Fay. Chelsea's teeth are like murder when she gets to Fay. Fay isn't quite as aggressive and just sniffs. What do I do?

-Puppy Problems


Bailey's Reply:

Dear Puppy Problems,

It seems like your pups are getting to know each other. You just got Chelsea, and she's probably unsure of where she is in her new pack. Her way of dealing with it is by snapping at Fay.

“Most dogs will tolerate the antics (and inappropriate behaviors) of very young puppies that they would not with a mature adult dog.”

But Fay appears to be fluent in "dog" by not snapping back. She's calm, cool, collected. When Chelsea snaps, Fay simply sniffs the ground. This is known as a "calming signal". This is good! Fay is signaling to Chelsea, "Hey, chill out. You've got nothing to worry about with me." Common calming signals are sniffing the ground, yawning, licking around the mouth, and sniffing the ground as you described Fay doing.

Most dogs will tolerate the antics (and inappropriate behaviors) of very young puppies that they would not with a mature adult dog. This could be why Fay is allowing Chelsea to behave like she is.

As these two mature, this type of behavior should diminish. However, keep a close eye on their interactions to ensure that they aren't getting out of hand. If you're unsure if they can be left alone together, make sure that they are both safely confined in separate areas until you can supervise them.

Good luck to you and your newest family members!

<wags!>

Bailey


 

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